Sonology Timeline

20 June 1945
Roelof Vermeulen, head of the Acoustics Department at Philips Research Laboratories: “The fact that we consider radio receivers, phonograph players and sound film projectors as musical instruments is essential for our vision on the future of music […]”.

December 1952 – September 1958
Incidental productions of (radiophonic) works with electronics at Nederlandse Radio Unie (NRU).

From left to right: Piet Bottema, Ton de Leeuw and Arie Brandon working at the NRU on De Leeuw’s radiophonic oratorium “Job” in 1956.

April 1956
Temporary studio for electronic music at Philips Research Laboratories (in Room 306).

Henk Badings and Roelof Vermeulen during the production of Badings’ ballet music “Kaïn en Abel” in Room 306 at Philips Research Laboratories, April 1956.

July 1956
Walter Maas establishes the Contactorgaan Elektronische Muziek (CEM).

August 1957
Temporary studio for electronic music at Philips Research Laboratories (in the demonstration hall).

Dick Raaijmakers and Jan de Bruyn during the production of Badings’ “Variations électroniques” in the demonstration hall of the acoustics department at Philips Research Laboratories, August 1957.

September 1957
Studio for electronic music education at Technische Hogeschool (TH) Delft.

Peter Schat in the electronic music studio at TH Delft, 1958.

September 1957 – April 1958
Edgard Varèse works on Le poème électronique in a temporary studio for electronic music at Philips’ Electroacoustics Division (ELA).

Edgard Varèse and Willem Tak during the production of the music for “Le poème électronique”, 1957.

October 1957 – October 1960
Studio for electronic music at Philips Research Laboratories (in Room 306).

Studio for electronic music in Room 306 of the Philips Research Laboratories, January 1958.

May 1958 – October 1958
Le poème électronique performed in the Philips Pavilion at the Brussels World’s Fair.

The Philips Pavilion at the Brussels World’s Fair of 1958.

November 1960
The studio for electronic music at Philips Research Laboratories is transferred to Rijks Universiteit Utrecht (RUU) and is now called Studio voor Elektronische Muziek (STEM).

Dock Raaijmakers in the studio for electronic music at the Rijks Universiteit Utrecht, 1961.

January 1961
Studio at TH Delft closes.

June 1961
Studio fot electronic music education at CEM in Bilthoven.

Studio for electronic music at CEM in Bilthoven, June 1961.

December 1961
Dick Raaijmakers leaves STEM.

October 1962
First edition of the course for electronic music taught by Gottfried Michael Koenig and Jaap Vink starts at CEM in Bilthoven.
Roelof Vermeulen hands over STEM’s leadership to Henk Badings.

Klaus Gorter, Gottfried Michael Koenig (below) and Jaap Vink in the Studio for electronic music at CEM in Bilthoven, 1964.

April 1963
Jan Boerman and Dick Raaijmakers establish their first private studio for electronic music in The Hague’s Daendelsstraat.

June 1963
First reconstruction of the studio at STEM in Utrecht completed.

Studio for electronic music at the Rijks Universiteit Utrecht after the first reconstruction, June 1963.

August 1963
Jan Boerman and Dick Raaijmakers establish their second private studio for electronic music in The Hague’s Zuilingstraat.

Jan Boerman and Dick Raaijmakers in their second private studio, Zuilingstraat 25 The Hague.

September 1964
Gottfried Michael Koenig installed as Artistic Director at STEM in Utrecht.

Gottfried Michael Koenig, Frank de Vries and Walter Maas at STEM in Utrecht, June 1964.

April 1967
Official opening of the studio for electronic music at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague.

Studio for electronic music at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague, late 1966.

October 1967
STEM in Utrecht is renamed “Institute of Sonology”, start of the first one-year course in Sonology, second reconstruction of the studios completed.

Luctor Ponse and Ton Bruynèl in Sonology’s Studio 1, October 1967.

May 1971
DEC PDP-15 computer operational at the Institute of Sonology.

DEC PDP-15 computer in Sonology’s Studio 1, May 1971.

July 1986
The Institute of Sonology moves to the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague. Gottfried Michale Koenig retires, Stan Tempelaars becomes the new head.

Rack with equipment from Studio 3 going into the moving van for transportation to The Hague, July 1986.

October 1986
The Royal Conservatoire hosts the 12th International Computer Music Conference (ICMC).

September 1988
A four-year bachelor’s degree programme in Sonology starts.

January 1993
Opening of the new Sonology studios at the Royal Conservatoire.

Konrad Boehmer and Wart Wamsteker in Studio BEA5, January 1993.

September 1994
Konrad Boehmer becomes the new head of Sonology.

September 1998
Beginning of the Master of Music in Sonology degree programme.

May 2006
Konrad Boehmer retires, Kees Tazelaar becomes the new head of Sonology.

December 2009
Partnership agreement between the Institute of Sonology and the Groupe de Recherches Musicales (GRM) in Paris.

Henk van der Meulen, Daniel Teruggi and Kees Tazelaar celebrate signing the GRM–Sonology partnership, 2 December 2009.

September 2011
Beginning of the Instruments & Interfaces master’s programme with STEIM.

April 2012
Sonology organizes the symposium Géométrie spatiale around the electroacoustic works of Iannis Xenakis.

April 2013
Sonology organizes the symposium Composing Spaces: Spatial Music from Gabrieli to the 21st Century.

September 2014
Beginning of the Audio Communication & Sonology double degree master’s programme with Technische Universität Berlin.

November 2014
Sonology organizes the symposium 50 Years of Electroacoustic and Computer Music Education.

March 2016
Trevor Wishart is the first Konrad Boehmer Visiting Professor at Sonology.

December 2016
Sonology organizes the symposium Historically Informed Performance Practice of Electroacoustic Music.

May 2019
Sonology and ACPA organize the symposium Transformations of the Audible.

2021
The Royal Conservatoire will move to a new building in The Hague’s city centre.